Drive speed problem

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aeromaxx
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2019 11:19 am

Drive speed problem

Post by aeromaxx »

Could anyone shed any light on as to why I sometimes get drive speed problem errors?

I am using Windows, and the GUI, and v3.00 of the software.

I did see, but the links on the thread are broken, atleast the releases.softpress.org reports an error in chrome stating that an IP address could not be found.

viewtopic.php?t=29&sid=b86a58fe1b7c3aae5a37ad0114dc1cb8
ZrX
Posts: 658
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 9:09 pm

Re: Drive speed problem

Post by ZrX »

If the drive is 5.25" the disk might not spin freely in its sleeve.
aiuto
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2020 4:54 am

Re: Drive speed problem

Post by aiuto »

I am seeing the same "Drive speed problem detected" problems on some diskettes.

Let's presume this is a problem with the disk spinning freely. Does anyone have advice on how to improve the diskette?
I can puff some compressed air into it. I think that would not cause harm, but I am no expert.
FWIW, these were Xerox media, written in 1988, stored indoors until now and never read.
This is the first time they are spinning ever.
brightcaster
Posts: 432
Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:48 pm

Re: Drive speed problem

Post by brightcaster »

Most of the time it is the disc that stucks in the sleeve because it has deformed over the years. If you dare and just want to dump the data on it, you can put the disk into another sleeve. If there is nothing of value on them (e.g. you just want to use them for general purpose), I would throw them into the bin.

David
SomeGuy
Posts: 333
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 8:18 pm

Re: Drive speed problem

Post by SomeGuy »

First of all "speed problems" reported by DTC have to do with the spindle motor. The linked thread has to do with the head step rate. Totally different things.

There are a number of different possibilities:
1: There is "gunk" on the cookie surface, increasing friction between the cookie and the head. I encounter this all the time, and if not immediately addressed it may rip up the disk surface. Visually inspect the disk surface. Usually a careful cleaning with a q-tip and water, or if no shedding alcohol, will fix this. Also, run a disk cleaner through your drive to make sure the head is not gunked.
2: The disk jacket is warped, or the jacket edges are crushed. Happens with 5.25" disks that have been stored underneath heavy books. If the physical disk is not important, the best way to address this is to carefully remove the cookie from the jacket and put it in a known good donor jacket. If the physical disk is important, you can try carefully bending/pulling the jacket back in shape. (Although I don't recommend it, very judicious use of a hair dryer can be used to intentionally warp the jacket so it puts less pressure on the cookie).
3: There is a problem with your drive. Using a known good disk, sanity check that it is spinning at 300RPM plus or minus only little bit. (360RPM for 1.2mb, 8" drives, or Mode 3 3.5" drives). Don't use a drive with a belt-driven spindle motor, that is just asking for problems. Make sure the spindle mechanisms are clean and engaging the disk properly. (I have a couple of Teac 3.5" drives that don't like to engage properly when they get dusty).
aiuto
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2020 4:54 am

Re: Drive speed problem

Post by aiuto »

Thanks for the tips. It turns out I was my drive was the problem. Or at least the mounting. While setting up for this batch of disks I pushed something up against the underside of the drive, causing friction on the flywheel underneath. Since I was also touching a brand new set of disks, I presumed the problem was in the disks.
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